Collecting Central Europe  
  The History of Collecting of Central and Eastern Europe  

Netherlandish Master, La belle Verdurière, © 1999 Musée du Louvre / Angèle Dequier
https://collections.louvre.fr/ark:/53355/cl010061598


Programme 2023




28 February

Markéta Ježková, Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences

Lecture of ca. 40 minutes followed by discussion

François Perrenot de Granvelle, Count of Cantecroix: A Renaissance Murderer, Thief and Art Lover in the service  of Rudolf II
François Perrenot belonged among the renaissance noble bad guys. He was sentenced to death for plotting to murder his wife; nevertheless, he acquired the famous Granvelle collection and sold the essential part of it to Rudolf II. The lecture will focus on his contacts with Rudolf II Habsburg.
Markéta Ježková studied French, Aesthetics and Art History. In 2019, she joined the Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences, as a postdoc researcher focusing on art collecting in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, particularly in circles associated with Rudolf II's court and digital humanities.
https://www.udu.cas.cz/en/lide/mgr-et-mgr-marketa-jezkova-ph-d


28 March

Éva Bicskei, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest

Recorded guided tour, followed by q&a and discussion

In early modern Europe, the first academic institutions dedicated to acquiring a complete
knowledge of the world were founded almost without exception with the patronage of the
monarchy. The fundamental condition necessary for these scholarly societies—or Gelehrtengesellschaft, learned society, or société savant, as they were called at the time—to operate was the creation of a language both usable in the field of science and comprehensible to the general public of the given state. The nineteenth century provided new impetus for the establishment of similar institutions, as during the period of nation building, these (newly-
founded) cultural institutions played a key role in the creation and dissemination of a national
consciousness.
These broader frameworks defined the primary goal of the Hungarian Learned Society, later
called the Hungarian Academy of Sciences: the development of a standardized national
language also suitable for the practice of the arts and sciences. The institution was founded in
1825 by a group of Hungarian magnates. Nevertheless, beside their yearly private financial
donations, many patriots presented and bequeathed full libraries and thousands of valuable
objects, among them scientific instruments and artworks; curiosities and Antiquities, which belong
today to the Art Collection of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, established quite late, in
1994. Thus the Art Collection consists mainly, but not exclusively, of nineteenth- and twentieth-
century portraits of founders, presidents, secretaries and prominent members of the Academy,
and the remnants of several small historical and art collections donated to the institution during its existence. The guided tour reflects the history of the art institutions historically located in the building in the Academy as well; the arduous process of (re)searching the lost art objects of the Academy, as well.

Éva Bicskei (MA in History, PhD in Art History) is senior research fellow at the Institute of Art History at the Research Centre for Humanities. Her research focuses on the social, cultural and institutional history of nineteenth-century art in Hungary in European context. Her publications include a historical monograph on the Hungarian academic painter Bertalan Székely (Budapest, 2010); a monograph on the (scientific) collections of the Hungarian
Academy of Sciences (Budapest, 2021); an edited volume on the history of the house of the
Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Budapest, 2018); two articles in a peer-reviewed international journal (Social Policy, Oxford; Male Bonds in Nineteeth Century Art, LUP, 2022); and numerous articles and chapters in collective volumes. Éva serves as Curator-in- Chief at the Art Collection of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, conceiving and organising numerous art exhibitions.


April


Three ten-minute presentations followed by discussion

The Kunst- und Wunderkammer


May


Lecture of ca. 40 minutes followed by discussion


June


Recorded guided tour, followed by q&a and discussion


July


Three ten-minute presentations followed by discussion